Roadwork updates: Audubon, Black Pearl, East Carrollton, Broadmoor, Central City, Freret, Fontainebleau

From the Mayor’s Office

Audubon Group A

After taking a pause during the holidays, Boh Bros Construction Co. crews continued underground utility work and roadway restoration in the Audubon neighborhood as part of the $7.3 million Audubon Group A infrastructure improvement project.? In January, crews continued excavation and milling work on Hurst and Octavia streets. Waterline work on Webster and Henry Clay streets continued in close collaboration with Sewerage & Water Board. The project is currently scheduled to be complete in summer 2021, weather permitting. Black Pearl, East Carrollton Group A

The $11.9 million Black Pearl, East Carrollton Group A project, which began construction in August 2020, continues to make progress.

Cambronne and Birch intersection closes for upgrades as the Hollygrove, Leonidas roadwork project moves forward

Beginning on Monday (Feb. 1) and continuing through Friday (Feb. 5), weather permitting, Department of Public Works contractor Wallace C. Drennan Inc. will close the intersection at Cambronne and Birch streets to vehicular traffic as part of the Hollygrove, Leonidas Group A project. Traffic controls and signage will be in place; residents and commuters are reminded to use caution when driving, bicycling and walking near the construction site. Construction crews will close the intersection to remove and replace the entire intersection all at one time.

South Claiborne neutral ground is getting a makeover

 

South Claiborne Avenue is getting an upgrade, with both drainage and beautification in mind, near the Carrollton, Leonidas and Fontainebleau neighborhoods. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has begun planting trees on the neutral ground for the restoration project replacing the green infrastructure removed for the construction of underground drainage improvements. The restoration is part of the corps’ Southeast Louisiana Flood Control Project, a $2 billion set of infrastructure improvements meant to reduce the risk of flooding in the event of heavy rain.  

The project will stretch from Leonidas to Pine streets and include 98 new trees. Six varieties of deciduous and evergreen trees have been chosen: nuttall oak, bald cypress, southern magnolia, spruce pine, sweet bay magnolia and “Muskogee” crape myrtle.

Sewerage & Water Board repairing water valve in Carrollton area

From the Sewerage & Water Board

Starting at 8 a.m. today (March 21), Sewerage & Water Board crews will repair a broken water valve on South Carrollton Avenue and Zimpel Street in the Carrollton neighborhood. This work is being done in order to avoid a future unexpected loss of service in this area. This valve replacement will also increase the redundancy needed to protect the distribution system. During this repair, some residents in the Carrollton neighborhood will likely experience low to no water pressure. All water pressure is expected to be restored before the end of day.

S&WB planning water-main repairs in Carrrollton area on Saturday

Sewerage & Water Board crews will repair a broken water valve on South Carrollton Avenue and Zimpel Street in the Carrollton neighborhood. Repairs will begin Saturday (March 7) at 8 a.m.

Repairs will continue through Sunday. The S&WB said it is making the repairs on a weekend to avoid disrupting service to nearby schools while classes are in session. During this repair, some residents in the Carrollton neighborhood will likely experience low to no water pressure. Residents are encouraged to have bottled water available and make other preparations.

Newly planted Napoleon Avenue trees shielded from barrage of beads

By Nicholas Reimann, Uptown Messenger

It’s become one of the postcard images of Carnival in New Orleans — beads and other debris lining trees along the Uptown parade route, some to the point of being hardly recognizable. But parade-goers this season on the Napoleon Avenue portion of the route won’t take in any sights that like there — at least if the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has its way. That’s because over the past week, the corps has installed more than 100 nets to block beads from latching onto trees on the Napoleon Avenue neutral ground — trees that have just been planted in the past month and are still getting used to their environment, according to corps spokesman Ricky Boyett. “The timing and impacts of Mardi Gras season have been a known factor in this project since its early planning. Netting has been placed to shield the trees from beads becoming wrapped around young branches,” Boyett said, adding that temporary fencing has also been put up around trees to keep pedestrians from walking on the developing root systems.

But what would likely be the most damaging for the trees actually wouldn’t be the beads themselves, according to Boyett, but their removal, which he said could damage new growth.

Uptown homeowners frustrated over skyrocketing S&WB bills

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Video and story by Madison Mcloughlin, Pack News

Uptown homeowner Mark Heller noticed what he said had to be a mistake in one of his Sewerage & Water Board bills several months ago. What was usually a bill for around $100 was now a bill for $697 for a single month. There was no explanation. “I would expect there to be a small flood somewhere in my yard with a bill that size, but we don’t see any leaks anywhere,” he said. Heller is not alone in his frustration.

Sewerage & Water Board liable for damage from SELA construction, judge rules

Orleans Parish Civil District Court Judge Nakisha Ervin-Knott ruled that the New Orleans Sewerage & Water Board is legally responsible for the substantial damages caused to more than 350 Uptown homes and businesses as a result of construction of the massive SELA drainage project. The court on Monday, Jan. 6, granted the plaintiff’s motion for partial summary judgment, finding the city agency the sole responsible party for claims of inverse condemnation, custodial liability and timber pile-driving claims.

According to plaintiffs’ attorney Michael Whitaker, all that is left now is for each claimant to prove the extent of the damage to their property. The ruling means claimants who provide evidence of damage will have their claims more swiftly decided and judgment entered in their favor. Trial on the next 20 claims is set for Tuesday, Jan.